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October 12th- Descriptors

This week we  learned how to describe people, including adjectives and outfits (list below). The facial expressions and how you are moving your hands has a greater impact on these descriptive signs. After we learned the terms we went around the room and each described our families to the rest of the group as practice with the signs from the last 2 weeks.

age (years old)
very
big (say chaw)
many
much
more
small (suck in)
skinny (suck in)
moderate (mmm)
fat (bulgy face)
pregnant
hair
length
types of hair
medium
bald (bare over the head)
face
ugly
beautiful
beard (describe, draw on face)
height (relative to you)
hair colors
blonde
clothers
pants
skirt
dress
earrings
shoes
boots
socks
flip flops
jacket
sweatshirt
hood
headband
necklace
glasses
sun glasses
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We covered a lot of new signs this week because a lot of them are related.
First we worked on family signs. When signing about people normally female signs are near the lower half of the face and male signs are on the upper half. There are a lot of family signs that are combination signs like daughter which would be the sign for baby and the sign for girl.
After we went through the family signs we learned some school signs. These also have similarities between them.
Here is the vocab list:
family
important
mom
dad
girl
boy
baby
daughter
son
brother
sister
aunt
uncle
cousin (gender)
niece
nephew
grandma
grandpa
husband
wife
friends
in-law
granddaughter
grandson
girlfriend
boyfriend
wedding
marriage
fiancee
dog
cat
fish
school
college
university
math
science
history
music
geography
geometry
world
art
english
biology
chemisty
physics
gym
psychcology

Since we covered so many signs last week, we spent a majority of the time reviewing time signs, colors, and Wh- questions.  Then we went into a little more detail on numbers, since they are related to telling time and such.

For ordinal numbers [1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.], you make the sign of the number with palm out, and then rotate your wrist toward you [if you’re right-handed, this will be counter-clockwise].  Do this for numbers 1-9.  Once you reach 10, sign the number, then finger spell “th”.

To make something possessive, use the same motion as for 1st, 2nd, 3rd etc, with the letter S at the end of the person’s name.

To talk in the “hundreds,” make the sign of the number, then pull your hand back and kind of make a claw with your fingers. [It’s hard to describe, but easy once you see it….] Or you can simply make the number and follow it with the letter C.  If the number is 357, do 3 hundred, and then 5 and 7 separately.
For fractions, just sign one number, move your hand down and sign the other, with your palm facing inward.
Here’s the vocab:

  • Numbers 21-999
  • Ordinal numbers: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc
  • Fractions
  • Possessives
  • Breakfast [morning food]
  • Lunch [noon food]
  • Dinner [afternoon/night food]

Hey everyone! This week we covered time signs and colors.  Remember when you’re telling time, you shake the hour number up from your wrist, then give the minutes number.
Here’s the vocab:

  • Yes
  • no
  • always
  • lonely
  • time
  • now/today
  • tomorrow
  • yesterday
  • future
  • past
  • everyday/daily
  • Monday through Sunday
  • week
  • weekend
  • last week
  • this week
  • year
  • yearly
  • month
  • monthly
  • close/near
  • morning
  • noon
  • afternoon
  • night/evening
  • midnight
  • all day
  • all night
  • day
  • work
  • church
  • minute
  • second
  • hour
  • seasons
  • ugly
  • dry
  • awesome
  • praising
  • hundreds
  • Columbus
  • blue
  • green
  • purple
  • pink
  • white
  • brown
  • orange
  • yellow
  • gold
  • silver
  • gray
  • black
  • tan
  • “it doesn’t matter”

This week we learned Wh- questions and responses.  Remember, when you’re asking Wh- questions, your eyebrows are down.  This is called topicalization and can be the main difference between some very similar signs.

Here’s the vocab:

  • who
  • what
  • when
  • where
  • why
  • how/how are you
  • which
  • what are you doing/what’s going on/what are you going to do
  • what’s up
  • good
  • bad
  • okay
  • fine
  • so-so
  • gross
  • sick
  • thirsty
  • hungry
  • tired
  • happy
  • sad
  • worried
  • tired
  • busy
  • thinking
  • awake
  • cold
  • hot
  • warm
  • freezing
  • describe
  • very
  • big
  • small
  • skinny
  • moderate
  • fat
  • pregnant
  • hair (long, short, curly, straight)
  • bald
  • face
  • beautiful/handsome
  • ugly
  • beard
  • stubble
  • mustache
  • tall
  • short
  • blonde
  • old
  • young
  • freckles
  • smile
  • muscular
  • charming [charm has]
  • clothes
  • earrings
  • shirt
  • skirt/dress
  • pants
  • shoes
  • boots
  • socks
  • jacket
  • gloves
  • hat
  • glasses
  • tie
  • bow tie
  • suspenders
  • watch
  • necklace
  • bracelet
  • plaid
  • stripes
  • lost/drop
  • almost
  • that
  • once/twice etc
  • ages
  • Cabinet
  • Tablecloth
  • Spoon
  • Fork
  • Knife
  • For
  • Remember (events and facts)
  • Think
  • Know
  • Shoes
  • Boots
  • Socks
  • Pillow
  • Horn
  • Unicorn
  • Whale
  • Idiot
  • Writing
  • Pen
  • Pencil
  • Start
  • Stop
  • Popcorn

Another more random list 🙂 have fun!

Today and went over some Easter signs, in honor of the upcoming holiday weekend. We also worked on trying to translate Peter Cotton Tail, the words are included in the list below.

(some of these we have done before, but we reviewed them in Easter context):

  • Easter
  • egg
  • jump/hop
  • basket
  • bunny
  • chick
  • lamb
  • candy
  • jelly bean (jelly candy)
  • grass
  • coloring eggs
  • Happy Easter
  • Lord
  • God
  • Jesus
  • cross
  • Good Sunday
  • worship
  • hunt/search
  • path/trail
  • cotton (white and soft)
  • arrives
  • happening/ event
  • tail
  • cake
  • ham (meat, finger spell ham)
  • butter
  • soap
  • salt and pepper
  • train
  • best
  • worst
  • most

This week we touched on basic sentence structure and practiced with a few short sentences.  We will do this in more detail in later lessons :]

Generally, the order of the sentence is as follows:

time, subject, object, verb, negation [not, never, no, etc.]

Verbs are not conjugated in sign language, so the meaning of the sentence [you vs. I, question vs. statement] is based highly on context and facial expressions.  Also, the sentences use only the necessary words to get the point across, which means they are much simpler than English sentences.

Examples: [words in brackets are optional depending on context]

I eat breakfast at 8am. –> 8 morning food/eat [refresher/breakdown: time is indicated by the sign for the number rising from your “watch”, then the sign for morning, then the noun/verb for food/eat–they’re the same]

She goes to work at 9am. –> 9 morning [she] work goes to

Eddie plays basketball every Friday. –> weekly Friday Eddie basketball plays

I don’t drink beer. –> beer [drink] never/not

I have a test on Thursday. –> Thursday test [I] have

Sorry if this format is confusing…if you can think of a better way for me to “translate” just let me know!

We covered a ton of new signs these two weeks for things in and around the house.

Inside:

  • house
  • home
  • room
  • restroom/bathroom
  • kitchen
  • bedroom
  • living room
  • garage
  • up/down- stairs
  • dining room
  • family room
  • hallway
  • attic [finger-spelled]
  • work
  • office
  • basement
  • window
  • closet

Furniture:

  • blinds
  • couch
  • bed
  • blanket
  • comforter
  • pillow
  • chair, recliner
  • rocking chair
  • table
  • door, front door
  • fireplace
  • oven
  • stove
  • microwave
  • dishwasher
  • fridge [r-e-f]
  • freezer
  • counter
  • shower
  • bathtub
  • towel
  • tissue
  • mirror
  • sink
  • curtains
  • lamp
  • dresser
  • desk [finger-spelled]
  • coffee table
  • (book)shelf
  • phone
  • clock
  • art
  • picture, picture frame
  • tv [finger-spelled]
  • ceiling fan
  • air conditioning [a-c]
  • rug*

Outside:

  • porch*
  • building materials [wood, stone, etc.]
  • fence
  • swimming pool*
  • yard*
  • roof*
  • work
  • school
  • homework
  • library
  • church
  • store
  • bus*
  • car
  • driving
  • road
  • traffic
  • accident

*These words are lone signs, meaning they are finger spelled in a certain way.  Bus and rug are spelled in a vertical arc, and porch, roof, pool, and yard are spelled moving out in front of you.