Category: Nouns


Hey everyone! This week we covered time signs and colors.¬† Remember when you’re telling time, you shake the hour number up from your wrist, then give the minutes number.
Here’s the vocab:

  • Yes
  • no
  • always
  • lonely
  • time
  • now/today
  • tomorrow
  • yesterday
  • future
  • past
  • everyday/daily
  • Monday through Sunday
  • week
  • weekend
  • last week
  • this week
  • year
  • yearly
  • month
  • monthly
  • close/near
  • morning
  • noon
  • afternoon
  • night/evening
  • midnight
  • all day
  • all night
  • day
  • work
  • church
  • minute
  • second
  • hour
  • seasons
  • ugly
  • dry
  • awesome
  • praising
  • hundreds
  • Columbus
  • blue
  • green
  • purple
  • pink
  • white
  • brown
  • orange
  • yellow
  • gold
  • silver
  • gray
  • black
  • tan
  • “it doesn’t matter”
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  • describe
  • very
  • big
  • small
  • skinny
  • moderate
  • fat
  • pregnant
  • hair (long, short, curly, straight)
  • bald
  • face
  • beautiful/handsome
  • ugly
  • beard
  • stubble
  • mustache
  • tall
  • short
  • blonde
  • old
  • young
  • freckles
  • smile
  • muscular
  • charming [charm has]
  • clothes
  • earrings
  • shirt
  • skirt/dress
  • pants
  • shoes
  • boots
  • socks
  • jacket
  • gloves
  • hat
  • glasses
  • tie
  • bow tie
  • suspenders
  • watch
  • necklace
  • bracelet
  • plaid
  • stripes
  • lost/drop
  • almost
  • that
  • once/twice etc
  • ages
  • Cabinet
  • Tablecloth
  • Spoon
  • Fork
  • Knife
  • For
  • Remember (events and facts)
  • Think
  • Know
  • Shoes
  • Boots
  • Socks
  • Pillow
  • Horn
  • Unicorn
  • Whale
  • Idiot
  • Writing
  • Pen
  • Pencil
  • Start
  • Stop
  • Popcorn

Another more random list ūüôā have fun!

Today and went over some Easter signs, in honor of the upcoming holiday weekend. We also worked on trying to translate Peter Cotton Tail, the words are included in the list below.

(some of these we have done before, but we reviewed them in Easter context):

  • Easter
  • egg
  • jump/hop
  • basket
  • bunny
  • chick
  • lamb
  • candy
  • jelly bean (jelly candy)
  • grass
  • coloring eggs
  • Happy Easter
  • Lord
  • God
  • Jesus
  • cross
  • Good Sunday
  • worship
  • hunt/search
  • path/trail
  • cotton (white and soft)
  • arrives
  • happening/ event
  • tail
  • cake
  • ham (meat, finger spell ham)
  • butter
  • soap
  • salt and pepper
  • train
  • best
  • worst
  • most

We covered a ton of new signs these two weeks for things in and around the house.

Inside:

  • house
  • home
  • room
  • restroom/bathroom
  • kitchen
  • bedroom
  • living room
  • garage
  • up/down- stairs
  • dining room
  • family room
  • hallway
  • attic [finger-spelled]
  • work
  • office
  • basement
  • window
  • closet

Furniture:

  • blinds
  • couch
  • bed
  • blanket
  • comforter
  • pillow
  • chair, recliner
  • rocking chair
  • table
  • door, front door
  • fireplace
  • oven
  • stove
  • microwave
  • dishwasher
  • fridge [r-e-f]
  • freezer
  • counter
  • shower
  • bathtub
  • towel
  • tissue
  • mirror
  • sink
  • curtains
  • lamp
  • dresser
  • desk [finger-spelled]
  • coffee table
  • (book)shelf
  • phone
  • clock
  • art
  • picture, picture frame
  • tv [finger-spelled]
  • ceiling fan
  • air conditioning [a-c]
  • rug*

Outside:

  • porch*
  • building materials [wood, stone, etc.]
  • fence
  • swimming pool*
  • yard*
  • roof*
  • work
  • school
  • homework
  • library
  • church
  • store
  • bus*
  • car
  • driving
  • road
  • traffic
  • accident

*These words are lone signs, meaning they are finger spelled in a certain way.  Bus and rug are spelled in a vertical arc, and porch, roof, pool, and yard are spelled moving out in front of you.

  • Christmas
  • Christmas Tree
  • Merry Christmas [M C, or Happy Christmas]
  • Hannukah
  • Happy New Year
  • Happy Birthday
  • Cookies
  • Milk
  • Ornament
  • Stars (bright or not)
  • Candy cane
  • Santa
  • Elf
  • Reindeer
  • Gift
  • Snow
  • Snowman/Snowperson
  • Chimney [firestack]
  • Song
  • Stocking [socks big]
  • Coat
  • Hat
  • Hope
  • to
  • Dear

In honor of Halloween coming up this weekend, we learned some signs for vocabulary surrounding the holiday! This video also reenacts some of our words that we learnedРand so does this one. Enjoy!

Nouns:

  • Halloween
  • mask
  • ghost
  • soul
  • spirit
  • monster
  • pumpkin
  • jack-o-lantern (pumpkin smile)
  • candles
  • leaf/leaves
  • vampire
  • witch
  • mouse
  • costume (fool’s clothes)
  • trick-or-treat
  • harvest
  • broom
  • spider
  • bat
  • scarecrow (fake person scare birds)
  • fool
  • caramel
  • candy
  • candy corn
  • caramel (sugar sticky)
  • cat
  • blook
  • werewolf
  • devil
  • angel
  • grave
  • cemetary

Verbs:

  • Rake
  • haunt
  • scare

Adjectives:

  • dark
  • dead

Hello loyal readers,
I must make a formal apology for my lack of attendance to the recent ASL meetings, so there are many an overdue post.

To my knowledge, the following list makes up what I missed. Feel free to comment below with any other words I missed!

Nouns:

  • Home
  • house
  • room
  • restroom/bathroom
  • kitchen
  • bedroom
  • living room
  • garage
  • up/down- stairs
  • dining room
  • family room
  • hallway
  • attic
  • work
  • office
  • basement
  • porch
  • fence
  • yard
  • roof
  • school
  • homework
  • library
  • church
  • store
  • car
  • road
  • traffic
  • accident
  • bike
  • sidewalk
  • skateboard
  • wood
  • brick
  • stone
  • stucco
  • glass

Verb:

  • driving

Level 1:

Grammar:

  • To turn an activity into the type of person that performs it, add the ‚Äúp‚ÄĚ in a down motion after the action sign.
    • Ex: Art –> Artist.
  • Generally in ASL, male people signs (like “boy” and “man”) occur above the nose; female signs are usually below the nose. This video shows in greater detail (and has links to more fun things!).

People Signs:

  • people
  • man
  • woman
  • girl
  • boy
  • mom
  • dad
  • grandma
  • grandpa
  • sister
  • brother
  • cousin (girl and boy and neutral)
  • aunt
  • uncle
  • niece
  • nephew
  • daughter
  • son
  • baby
  • wife
  • husband
  • friend
  • family
  • These are other YouTube-ers that have varying vocab:
    • One¬†— bland, but concise.
    • Two¬†— step-by-step.
Colors:
  • blue
  • green
  • purple
  • yellow
  • orange
  • red
  • pink
  • black
  • white
  • tan
  • brown
  • gray
  • silver
  • gold

Level 3:
For a preemptive strike, we started interpreting Christmas carols this week. Look in the coming weeks for our attempts at conveying Christmas cheer with ASL!

Levels 1 and 2 were combined this week; level 3 continued separately.

Levels 1 & 2:

Telling Time:¬†This is done in ASL¬†by bringing the proper¬†number sign up from the wrist and then¬†adding “morning”, “afternoon”, “night” as necessary.

Introduction to Sentence Structure: Speaking an ASL sentence is much like drawing a picture. You start with: time –> subject –>¬†object –>¬†verb –>¬†question –>¬†negation.¬†

Vocabulary Review:

  • Basic answers to questions
    • fine
    • good
    • bad
    • ok
    • so-so
    • sick
    • gross
    • happy
    • sad
    • yes
    • no
    • not
    • never
    • none/nothing
  • Time signs
    • time
    • now/today
    • tomorrow
    • yesterday
    • everyday/daily
    • Monday-Sunday
    • week
    • weekend
    • last week
    • next week
    • month
    • monthly
    • year
    • every year
    • future
    • past
    • close/near,
    • morning
    • noon
    • afternoon
    • night
    • midnight
    • all day
    • all night
    • day
    • hour
    • minute
    • spring
    • summer
    • fall
    • winter
  • Polite signs
    • Thank you
    • You’re welcome
    • please
    • sorry

Level 3:

We spoke briefly about the absence of sarcasm in ASL, and noted that ASL has its own idiomatic expressions that are different from those of spoken English. For example, one would not literally translate “It’s raining cats and dogs” in ASL, instead they would just make exaggerated signs and faces for “rain”.

We also learned some about directionality and the differences/similarities between the signs for:

  • me—my—-myself
  • you–your–yourself
  • we—ours—us
  • the two of us
  • you and I “sharing”, having something in common; or two objects that have something in common or the same.
  • I tell you
  • You tell me

The main focus during the meeting today was¬†creating sentences with the right word order as well as some vocabulary to make said sentences. To denote the differences between the two, spoken English will be on the left, and the ASL equivalent will be¬†to the right of the “–>”.

  • Why weren’t you here last week? –> Last week you here not why? or Last week you gone why?
  • I can’t find the book. –> Book find can’t.
    • If you wanted to add possession, such as “my book”, then the sentence becomes –> Book mine find can’t.
  • Where is the trash can? –> Trash (put) where?
  • What is the homework? –> Homework what?
  • I have to go to class. –> Class go to must.
  • I ate breakfast this morning. –> Today morning food I ate.
  • I like your necklace. –> Necklace yours I like.
  • I’m going shopping tonight. –> Today night shopping I go.
  • I’m going shopping next week. –> Next week shopping will happen.
  • I’m happy that the rain stopped. –> Rain stop me happy.
  • I don’t understand. –> I understand not.

Vocab:

  • Verbs:
    • leave
    • hurry
    • shopping
    • need/must
    • know
    • understand¬†
    • fail
    • pass/succeed
  • Adjectives:
    • tired
    • smart
    • stupid
    • dumb
    • idiot(ic)
  • Nouns
    • church
    • test
    • Clothes
      • jacket
      • pants
      • skirt
      • dress
      • shirt
      • glasses
  • Other:
    • everything/all
    • very
    • that
    • because (“why” with raised eyebrows)
  • Cascades:
    • grow
    • gone
      • paper
      • nice
      • school
      • cheese
      • movie
    • meet
    • kiss
    • different
    • divorce
      • success
      • famous