Category: Adjectives


Since we covered so many signs last week, we spent a majority of the time reviewing time signs, colors, and Wh- questions.  Then we went into a little more detail on numbers, since they are related to telling time and such.

For ordinal numbers [1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.], you make the sign of the number with palm out, and then rotate your wrist toward you [if you’re right-handed, this will be counter-clockwise].  Do this for numbers 1-9.  Once you reach 10, sign the number, then finger spell “th”.

To make something possessive, use the same motion as for 1st, 2nd, 3rd etc, with the letter S at the end of the person’s name.

To talk in the “hundreds,” make the sign of the number, then pull your hand back and kind of make a claw with your fingers. [It’s hard to describe, but easy once you see it….] Or you can simply make the number and follow it with the letter C.  If the number is 357, do 3 hundred, and then 5 and 7 separately.
For fractions, just sign one number, move your hand down and sign the other, with your palm facing inward.
Here’s the vocab:

  • Numbers 21-999
  • Ordinal numbers: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc
  • Fractions
  • Possessives
  • Breakfast [morning food]
  • Lunch [noon food]
  • Dinner [afternoon/night food]

Hey everyone! This week we covered time signs and colors.  Remember when you’re telling time, you shake the hour number up from your wrist, then give the minutes number.
Here’s the vocab:

  • Yes
  • no
  • always
  • lonely
  • time
  • now/today
  • tomorrow
  • yesterday
  • future
  • past
  • everyday/daily
  • Monday through Sunday
  • week
  • weekend
  • last week
  • this week
  • year
  • yearly
  • month
  • monthly
  • close/near
  • morning
  • noon
  • afternoon
  • night/evening
  • midnight
  • all day
  • all night
  • day
  • work
  • church
  • minute
  • second
  • hour
  • seasons
  • ugly
  • dry
  • awesome
  • praising
  • hundreds
  • Columbus
  • blue
  • green
  • purple
  • pink
  • white
  • brown
  • orange
  • yellow
  • gold
  • silver
  • gray
  • black
  • tan
  • “it doesn’t matter”

This week we learned Wh- questions and responses.  Remember, when you’re asking Wh- questions, your eyebrows are down.  This is called topicalization and can be the main difference between some very similar signs.

Here’s the vocab:

  • who
  • what
  • when
  • where
  • why
  • how/how are you
  • which
  • what are you doing/what’s going on/what are you going to do
  • what’s up
  • good
  • bad
  • okay
  • fine
  • so-so
  • gross
  • sick
  • thirsty
  • hungry
  • tired
  • happy
  • sad
  • worried
  • tired
  • busy
  • thinking
  • awake
  • cold
  • hot
  • warm
  • freezing
  • describe
  • very
  • big
  • small
  • skinny
  • moderate
  • fat
  • pregnant
  • hair (long, short, curly, straight)
  • bald
  • face
  • beautiful/handsome
  • ugly
  • beard
  • stubble
  • mustache
  • tall
  • short
  • blonde
  • old
  • young
  • freckles
  • smile
  • muscular
  • charming [charm has]
  • clothes
  • earrings
  • shirt
  • skirt/dress
  • pants
  • shoes
  • boots
  • socks
  • jacket
  • gloves
  • hat
  • glasses
  • tie
  • bow tie
  • suspenders
  • watch
  • necklace
  • bracelet
  • plaid
  • stripes
  • lost/drop
  • almost
  • that
  • once/twice etc
  • ages

Today and went over some Easter signs, in honor of the upcoming holiday weekend. We also worked on trying to translate Peter Cotton Tail, the words are included in the list below.

(some of these we have done before, but we reviewed them in Easter context):

  • Easter
  • egg
  • jump/hop
  • basket
  • bunny
  • chick
  • lamb
  • candy
  • jelly bean (jelly candy)
  • grass
  • coloring eggs
  • Happy Easter
  • Lord
  • God
  • Jesus
  • cross
  • Good Sunday
  • worship
  • hunt/search
  • path/trail
  • cotton (white and soft)
  • arrives
  • happening/ event
  • tail
  • cake
  • ham (meat, finger spell ham)
  • butter
  • soap
  • salt and pepper
  • train
  • best
  • worst
  • most

In honor of Halloween coming up this weekend, we learned some signs for vocabulary surrounding the holiday! This video also reenacts some of our words that we learned– and so does this one. Enjoy!

Nouns:

  • Halloween
  • mask
  • ghost
  • soul
  • spirit
  • monster
  • pumpkin
  • jack-o-lantern (pumpkin smile)
  • candles
  • leaf/leaves
  • vampire
  • witch
  • mouse
  • costume (fool’s clothes)
  • trick-or-treat
  • harvest
  • broom
  • spider
  • bat
  • scarecrow (fake person scare birds)
  • fool
  • caramel
  • candy
  • candy corn
  • caramel (sugar sticky)
  • cat
  • blook
  • werewolf
  • devil
  • angel
  • grave
  • cemetary

Verbs:

  • Rake
  • haunt
  • scare

Adjectives:

  • dark
  • dead

Level 1:

Grammar:

  • To turn an activity into the type of person that performs it, add the “p” in a down motion after the action sign.
    • Ex: Art –> Artist.
  • Generally in ASL, male people signs (like “boy” and “man”) occur above the nose; female signs are usually below the nose. This video shows in greater detail (and has links to more fun things!).

People Signs:

  • people
  • man
  • woman
  • girl
  • boy
  • mom
  • dad
  • grandma
  • grandpa
  • sister
  • brother
  • cousin (girl and boy and neutral)
  • aunt
  • uncle
  • niece
  • nephew
  • daughter
  • son
  • baby
  • wife
  • husband
  • friend
  • family
  • These are other YouTube-ers that have varying vocab:
    • One — bland, but concise.
    • Two — step-by-step.
Colors:
  • blue
  • green
  • purple
  • yellow
  • orange
  • red
  • pink
  • black
  • white
  • tan
  • brown
  • gray
  • silver
  • gold

Level 3:
For a preemptive strike, we started interpreting Christmas carols this week. Look in the coming weeks for our attempts at conveying Christmas cheer with ASL!

Levels 1 and 2 were combined this week; level 3 continued separately.

Levels 1 & 2:

Telling Time: This is done in ASL by bringing the proper number sign up from the wrist and then adding “morning”, “afternoon”, “night” as necessary.

Introduction to Sentence Structure: Speaking an ASL sentence is much like drawing a picture. You start with: time –> subject –> object –> verb –> question –> negation. 

Vocabulary Review:

  • Basic answers to questions
    • fine
    • good
    • bad
    • ok
    • so-so
    • sick
    • gross
    • happy
    • sad
    • yes
    • no
    • not
    • never
    • none/nothing
  • Time signs
    • time
    • now/today
    • tomorrow
    • yesterday
    • everyday/daily
    • Monday-Sunday
    • week
    • weekend
    • last week
    • next week
    • month
    • monthly
    • year
    • every year
    • future
    • past
    • close/near,
    • morning
    • noon
    • afternoon
    • night
    • midnight
    • all day
    • all night
    • day
    • hour
    • minute
    • spring
    • summer
    • fall
    • winter
  • Polite signs
    • Thank you
    • You’re welcome
    • please
    • sorry

Level 3:

We spoke briefly about the absence of sarcasm in ASL, and noted that ASL has its own idiomatic expressions that are different from those of spoken English. For example, one would not literally translate “It’s raining cats and dogs” in ASL, instead they would just make exaggerated signs and faces for “rain”.

We also learned some about directionality and the differences/similarities between the signs for:

  • me—my—-myself
  • you–your–yourself
  • we—ours—us
  • the two of us
  • you and I “sharing”, having something in common; or two objects that have something in common or the same.
  • I tell you
  • You tell me

The main focus during the meeting today was creating sentences with the right word order as well as some vocabulary to make said sentences. To denote the differences between the two, spoken English will be on the left, and the ASL equivalent will be to the right of the “–>”.

  • Why weren’t you here last week? –> Last week you here not why? or Last week you gone why?
  • I can’t find the book. –> Book find can’t.
    • If you wanted to add possession, such as “my book”, then the sentence becomes –> Book mine find can’t.
  • Where is the trash can? –> Trash (put) where?
  • What is the homework? –> Homework what?
  • I have to go to class. –> Class go to must.
  • I ate breakfast this morning. –> Today morning food I ate.
  • I like your necklace. –> Necklace yours I like.
  • I’m going shopping tonight. –> Today night shopping I go.
  • I’m going shopping next week. –> Next week shopping will happen.
  • I’m happy that the rain stopped. –> Rain stop me happy.
  • I don’t understand. –> I understand not.

Vocab:

  • Verbs:
    • leave
    • hurry
    • shopping
    • need/must
    • know
    • understand 
    • fail
    • pass/succeed
  • Adjectives:
    • tired
    • smart
    • stupid
    • dumb
    • idiot(ic)
  • Nouns
    • church
    • test
    • Clothes
      • jacket
      • pants
      • skirt
      • dress
      • shirt
      • glasses
  • Other:
    • everything/all
    • very
    • that
    • because (“why” with raised eyebrows)
  • Cascades:
    • grow
    • gone
      • paper
      • nice
      • school
      • cheese
      • movie
    • meet
    • kiss
    • different
    • divorce
      • success
      • famous

We discussed, again, the importance of topicalization [non-hand elements of signs]. For example, the difference between “who”, “salad” and “here” relies on differences in topicalization.

We separated into 3 group levels this meeting.

Level one:

  • ABC-s
  • 123-s
  • “W-” questions
    • Who
    • What
    • Where
    • When
    • Why
    • How
    • How are you?
    • How many (what number)
    • Which
    • What’s up?
    • What are you doing, what’s going on, what are you going to do?
Level Two: 
  • Responses to “How are you?”
    • Fine
    • Good
    • Bad
    • OK
    • So-so
    • Gross
    • Sick
    • Happy
    • Sad
  • Responses to “Yes/No” questions
    • Yes
    • No
    • Not
    • None
    • Never
  • Time signs
    • Time
    • Today
    • Yesterday
    • Tomorrow
    • Daily
    • Week
    • Weekly
    • Weekend
    • Month
    • Monthly
    • Year
    • Yearly
    • Monday-Sunday
Level 3: 
  • Basic ASL Sentence Structure: Time –> Subject –> Verb –> Negation (if any) –> Question (if any).
  • Furniture words review
  • Verbs
    • remember
    • forget/forgot
    • learn
    • study
    • teach
    • think
    • imagine
    • help [directional]
    • give
    • love
    • hate
    • like
    • don’t like
    • want
    • go out
    • run
    • walk
    • play
    • cook
    • clean
    • work
    • finish/done
    • arrive
    • try
    • focus
    • hear(ing)
    • drive
  • Nouns
    • noise
    • earthquake
    • traffic
    • garage
    • car crash
    • car
    • truck
  • Adjectives
    • hot
  • Cascades (one sign that leads to another related sign)
    • live
    • address
    • “You live where?”
      • memories
      • suppress
      • show
    • Pizza
    • Pepsi
      • dry
      • ugly
      • summer
      • black
    • write
    • paint

ASL song interpretation rarely follows the words of the song exactly, nor does it necessarily follow the proper grammar rules of either spoken English or ASL. This is an interpretation of the National Anthem.

Oh, say can you see by the dawn’s early light

Looking  seeing dawn

What so proudly we hailed at the twilight’s last gleaming?

Big big proud all of us celebrate light

Whose broad stripes and bright stars thru the perilous fight,

Four big stripes star sparkle through terrible fight/war

O’er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?

Over trenches watch “wavy classifier”

And the rocket’s red glare, the bombs bursting in air,

Red rocket “hand flash explosions”

Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there.

Show through all night flag steady “point to American flag nearby”

Oh, say does that star-spangled banner yet wave

Question marks stripes “wavy classifier”

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

Land free America people brave.